How Waiakea Water Has Transformed the Bottled Water Industry

The bottled water industry has been much of the same for many years, and despite the focus on conservation, no one has developed a better water bottle in all those years. Things are about to change in this industry if Waiakea Water has something to say about it. The company announced that they are going to release the very first plastic water bottle that will be fully degradable, in a sense changing the way this industry will have to look at how they move forward.https://www.beveragedaily.com/Article/2017/09/27/First-fully-degradable-plastic-bottle-Waiakea

Looking back to 2012 when Waiakea Water got in the bottled water game, they were already doing things others in this competitive market were not. The company CEO, Ryan Emmons, says his company was committed early on to donating 3 percent of revenues to help local charitable organizations. Having access to an endless supply of purified Hawaiian water, Emmons feels that they have a moral obligation to give back to those people that are in need.

Once Waiakea Water began growing, they starting to ramp up their efforts to help those in need. Now when a bottle of their volcanic purified water is sold, the company donates a full weeks worth of fresh water to a community in need. The reason for the continued effort to help others is because over 3 million people die every year from waterborne illnesses. Babies are dying everyday because they do not have access to the most basic of all human needs. Waiakea Water is doing everything to try and reduce these numbers in a big way.

The effort to help others is a huge task, so Waiakea Water partnered with PumpAid to reach more of those in need. The team at Waiakea Water donates their time, and meets with PumpAid associates who travel to countries with communities that have no fresh water, installing new water pumps and helping these communities to thrive. The team at Waiakea Water not only help install the pumps, they show how to maintain and repair the systems, as well as instruct community leaders on how to preserve this natural resource for years to come.